FCC adopts net neutrality rules to ban Internet discrimination – Yahoo Finance

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Federal regulators moved forward on Thursday with a net neutrality plan to protect openness on the Internet by treating the online world more like heavily regulated telecommunications markets.

This is good news I think. The Internet needs to be a level playing field and open for all.

FCC adopts net neutrality rules to ban Internet discrimination – Yahoo Finance

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Obama praises Chattanooga as ‘a tornado of innovation’ @ timesfreepress.com

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This is a great article about our hometown gigabit service being lauded by President Obama! We have wicked fast Internet here and its cheap.

Obama praises Chattanooga as ‘a tornado of innovation’ @ timesfreepress.com

The Problem With Web Searches

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How come web searches now look like more ways to get you to see ads. I know its all about search engine optimization and that sort of thing. All one wants to do is get the best information on their topic without having to wade through the irrelevant stuff or sites that look nice until you realize they are nothing but ways to sell you stuff you really don’t need. Back in the early days of Yahoo it was much easier to find something on the topic you wanted because then humans had more control over how searches were presented and sites curated.

All I wanna know more about is how to alleviate a snoring issue. Should be easy enough but nope.

Yahoo, It’s Back

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I’m digging Yahoo again. They have some killer apps on Android and iPhone. Their website is a very visited site on the Web too. They also own Tumblr which has been a good thing so far. As a news and all-round information portal its got its groove back. Everything old is new again so it seems. I like what Marissa Mayer is doing there. Yahoooo!

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todaysdocument:

Happy 25th Birthday, World Wide Web!

March 12, 2014, marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the World Wide Web. For most of that time, the National Archives has had some online presence. In 1994, the National Archives started a pilot project to make information about the agency available electronically through Gopher (remember that?) at gopher://gopher.nara.gov. Our first website, www.nara.gov, was launched in 1996. (“NARA” in the URL coming from the full name of the agency: the National Archives and Records Administration.)

Twenty-five years and many redesigns later, we’ve come a long way from gopher. But the Archives’ mission of making our holdings more readily available to the public has not changed. You can find us now at www.archives.gov, with an upgraded online digital catalog plus a bevy of social media offerings including Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Pinterest, blogs, and of course, Tumblr to connect with the public.

via Prologue: Pieces of History » The National Archives on the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web

What has the web changed about how you work or learn?  What do you remember most about life before the internet?

Happy Birthday World Wide Web…you changed many lives!

Instant Inquiry Results From Yesterday’s WiFi Question

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Yesterday I asked…

How long after arriving at someone’s house is it appropriate to ask for the WiFi password?

The answers I got were interesting. Some thought it wouldn’t be a good thing to do because it keeps one from connecting with people in your company. Others thought it would be OK with family but with friends only if they ask or use devices themselves. Timing is a issue too, some say you don’t want to sound too eager while others say ask for it as soon as possible.

This seems to be a new area of cyber etiquette. Use your best judgment depending on where you are and who you are with. Of course when asking for WiFi be sure to not hog bandwidth, thats never a polite thing to do.

AOL, Do You Use It?

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For years AOL was the way people connected to the Internet. It’s dial-up software made it easy to access the World Wide Web and its original content possible for millions of subscribers. A few years ago in order to keep itself going it offered everyone a free AOL email address to use with all its services including Instant Messenger. These days can we say its still relevant to the average user. Does anyone still use AOL?