Farewell Luther, The Airwaves Will Miss You

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Today a legend in the broadcasting community of Chattanooga passed away. Luther Masingill was a radio and television personality for both WDEF TV and Radio for over 70 years. He was on air during the beginning of World War II and during 9/11. He endeared himself to generations of people who call Chattanooga home.

Luther, yes he was an icon who was known by his first name helped announce the news of the community, play the music of a generation and helped reunite pets with their families. We were blessed to have a man of his talent be with us for so long. He was a hall-of-famer being inducted into both national and state halls for his contributions to the industry.

In an era of Sirius-XM, Pandora and the like Luther makes a great case for local radio. Having people from your community keeping you informed, entertained and enlightened. With the transient nature of people in media it is very rare for someone to stick and stay like Luther. He connected a community unlike any other. This man will be missed by our community, there will never be another like him.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27th

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International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27th, is an international memorial day for the victims of the Holocaust, the genocide that resulted in the annihilation of 6 million Jews, 2 million Gypsies (Roma and Sinti), 15,000 homosexual people and millions of others by the Nazi regime and its collaborators.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27th

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Columbus Day 2013

Many countries in the New World and elsewhere celebrate the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas, which happened on October 12, 1492, as an official holiday. Columbus Day first became an official state holiday in Colorado in 1906, and became a federal holiday in the United States in 1937, though people have celebrated Columbus’ voyage since the colonial period. In 1792, New York City and other U.S. cities celebrated the 300th anniversary of his landing in the New World. It’s traditionally celebrated on the 2nd Monday of October.

(Source and Photo : Wikipedia, Artist: Painting : Dióscoro Teófilo Puebla Tolín)

Remembering “The Dream” of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Today we remember The March on Washington that happened 50 years ago. Our nation has changed in these 50 years but the fight for equality for everyone continues. People are still in poverty, racism still exists, violence on our streets is still present. The dream of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in many ways has been achieved however there is still work to do. People of all races aren’t doing as well as they should.

Recent decisions in voting rights and voting procedure are keeping people from exercising democracy in its full intent. Expanding the rights of some does not mean contracting the rights of others.

Men, women and children of all races, creeds, color, orientation should have the same unalienable rights prescribed in the Declaration of Independence. Hate should never be a value of anyone. Opportunity should be an American value and brand that everyone should benefit from. When there is care for the least of these you reveal the best character of our nation.

I pray and hope for a nation that has a level playing field for everyone. So those who are in poverty from rural Tennessee to the streets of our largest cities will have what they need to make their lives better.

History and Us

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There is much history being made by people who are passionate about issues they care deeply about. From voting rights to abortion to gay marriage we are seeing some important things happen in the life of our nation. It’s amazing to see how everything is shaking out.

Justice is an important part of these events. Its about opportunities to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The important thing to know is that people are impacted in a real way. Lives are being changed. We are seeing TV and the Internet spark conversations about the history that is happening in real time.

How we respond to the current events of the day will show much about us as a country. This week we all realized how important it is to keep up with what’s going on. As I have learned this week change is a constant and we are all on a journey. People we don’t know are all making decisions on our behalf in our government and the courts. Locally decisions are made that deeply affect us all.

History teaches us things if we only listen. We are also making history by what we do in our lives. There is a ripple effect like a stone being thrown into a pond.

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D-Day Anniversary – June 6, 1944, 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. General Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end on June 6, the Allies gained a foot- hold in Normandy. The D-Day cost was high -more than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded – but more than 100,000 Soldiers began the march across Europe to defeat Hitler.

Thanks to every soldier who sacrificed that day. God bless you.